Arguing About Vaccines Doesn’t Usually Work — But This Might

Arguing About Vaccines Doesn’t Usually Work — But This Might

A doctor cradles a newborn who is sick with measles.

(© andriano_cz/Adobe)


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Junaid Nabi
Junaid Nabi, MD, MPH, is a physician, public health researcher, and a medical journalist. He currently manages several research projects at Brigham Health that include investigating provider- and hospital-level factors associated with racial and ethnic disparities in surgical oncology; evaluating the fiscal impact of consolidating care of complex patients; and, examining systematic factors that lead to opioid over-prescribing patterns after surgery. He has also undertaken research that examined the effect of health disparities that arise from social and political disenfranchisement and the relationship between trauma care and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Previously, he was a Fellow in Bioethics at Harvard Medical School Center for Bioethics where he studied bioethical issues in global healthcare delivery; role of bioethicists in Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and other evolving technologies; and, emotional intelligence in bioethical analysis. He is a New Voices Fellow at The Aspen Institute, Washington, D.C., and a Fellow at Harvard Graduate School Leadership Institute, Boston.
A new oral vaccine could prevent urinary tract infections for years

Urinary tract infections account for more than 8 million trips to the doctor each year.

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Few things are more painful than a urinary tract infection (UTI). Common in men and women, these infections account for more than 8 million trips to the doctor each year and can cause an array of uncomfortable symptoms, from a burning feeling during urination to fever, vomiting, and chills. For an unlucky few, UTIs can be chronic—meaning that, despite treatment, they just keep coming back.

But new research, presented at the European Association of Urology (EAU) Congress in Paris this week, brings some hope to people who suffer from UTIs.

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Sarah Watts

Sarah Watts is a health and science writer based in Chicago.

MILESTONE: Doctors have transplanted a pig organ into a human for the first time in history

A surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital prepares a pig organ for transplant.

Michelle Rose/Massachusetts General Hospital

Surgeons at Massachusetts General Hospital made history last week when they successfully transplanted a pig kidney into a human patient for the first time ever.

The recipient was a 62-year-old man named Richard Slayman who had been living with end-stage kidney disease caused by diabetes. While Slayman had received a kidney transplant in 2018 from a human donor, his diabetes ultimately caused the kidney to fail less than five years after the transplant. Slayman had undergone dialysis ever since—a procedure that uses an artificial kidney to remove waste products from a person’s blood when the kidneys are unable to—but the dialysis frequently caused blood clots and other complications that landed him in the hospital multiple times.

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Sarah Watts

Sarah Watts is a health and science writer based in Chicago.