Artificial Intelligence Needs Doctors As Much As They Need It

Artificial Intelligence Needs Doctors As Much As They Need It

In this futuristic medical concept, a doctor assesses a patient with robust machine assistance.

(© Elnur/Fotolia)


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Steven Haley
Steven Haley is a tech industry veteran and prolific angel investor. He is highly engaged at the leading edge of innovations through his company affiliations and in multiple capacities, which include advisor, operational roles, committee, and board member. He began his technology career working Numerically Controlled Systems (NC Machines), macro-assembler coding, applications hosted on mainframes and minicomputers, and broadband networking. Present-day initiatives relate to commercialization of software platforms. He has been involved in the healthcare sector for two decades serving on academic hospital boards, technology initiatives, and a medical investment advisory committee for a healthcare VC. He is also involved in numerous medical philanthropic activities, including establishing The BrainScience Foundation. His interest lie in adaptive learning software platforms, analytics, and the applications they support in healthcare, STEM education and enterprises.
person using an apple watch
Luke Chesser - Unsplash

Today’s podcast guest is Rosalind Picard, a researcher, inventor named on over 100 patents, entrepreneur, author, professor and engineer. When it comes to the science related to endowing computer software with emotional intelligence, she wrote the book. It’s published by MIT Press and called Affective Computing.

Dr. Picard is founder and director of the MIT Media Lab’s Affective Computing Research Group. Her research and engineering contributions have been recognized internationally. For example, she received the 2022 International Lombardy Prize for Computer Science Research, considered by many to be the Nobel prize in computer science.

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Matt Fuchs
Matt Fuchs is the host of the Making Sense of Science podcast and served previously as the editor-in-chief of Leaps.org. He writes as a contributor to the Washington Post, and his articles have also appeared in the New York Times, WIRED, Nautilus Magazine, Fortune Magazine and TIME Magazine. Follow him @fuchswriter.
Hidden figures: Five black women that changed science forever

Dr. May Edward Chinn, Kizzmekia Corbett, PhD., and Alice Ball, among others, have been behind some of the most important scientific work of the last century.


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Sarah Watts

Sarah Watts is a health and science writer based in Chicago.