“Synthetic Embryos”: The Wrong Term For Important New Research

“Synthetic Embryos”: The Wrong Term For Important New Research

This fluorescent image shows a representative post-implantation amniotic sac embroid.

(Courtesy of Yue Shao)


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Norbert Gleicher
Dr. Norbert Gleicher founded the Center for Human Reproduction (CHR) in 1981, after completing his residency at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York and holding top academic and administrative positions in various academic institutions in New York and Chicago. Always keen on simultaneously pursuing clinical care and research, Dr. Gleicher has published hundreds of peer-reviewed medical journal articles, abstracts and book chapters, in addition to editing textbooks that are now regarded as classics. Dr. Gleicher also holds adjunct professorship appointments at Rockefeller University in New York City, as well as Medical University Vienna.
When doctors couldn’t stop her daughter’s seizures, this mom earned a PhD and found a treatment herself.

Savannah Salazar (left) and her mother, Tracy Dixon-Salazaar, who earned a PhD in neurobiology in the quest for a treatment of her daughter's seizure disorder.

LGS Foundation

Twenty-eight years ago, Tracy Dixon-Salazaar woke to the sound of her daughter, two-year-old Savannah, in the midst of a medical emergency.

“I entered [Savannah’s room] to see her tiny little body jerking about violently in her bed,” Tracy said in an interview. “I thought she was choking.” When she and her husband frantically called 911, the paramedic told them it was likely that Savannah had had a seizure—a term neither Tracy nor her husband had ever heard before.

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Sarah Watts

Sarah Watts is a health and science writer based in Chicago.

A robot cafe in Tokyo is making work possible for people with disabilities.

A robot server, controlled remotely by a disabled worker, delivers drinks to patrons at the DAWN cafe in Tokyo.

Photo courtesy of dawn2021.orylab.com.

A sleek, four-foot tall white robot glides across a cafe storefront in Tokyo’s Nihonbashi district, holding a two-tiered serving tray full of tea sandwiches and pastries. The cafe’s patrons smile and say thanks as they take the tray—but it’s not the robot they’re thanking. Instead, the patrons are talking to the person controlling the robot—a restaurant employee who operates the avatar from the comfort of their home.

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Sarah Watts

Sarah Watts is a health and science writer based in Chicago.